Blog Archives

Most Successful Unsuccessful Program Ever

tablettaleslogoLast week was the most successful unsuccessful Tablet Tales program I’ve had yet. Only one family came to this pilot session at the Morgan Hill Library: a mom, a teenage girl, a 9ish year old boy and my most enthusiastic participant, a first grade girl. I had planned a family storytime, and what I did instead was sit on the floor next to my first grader and we looked at the huge books on the screen together and just read, talked and sang. We read Llama Llama. We sang and then read/sang the Itsy Bitsy Spider. We read a few Caldecotts from my recent Caldecott hunt. We guessed what the bunny would do next, we rhymed words, we made funny noises, I learned that she had lost a tooth recently, and she showed me how much she loved reading books.

After we’d run through all the books I’d planned, plus a whole handful more, I showed her the new Goodnight Moon app and then I told her and her family it was the end of storytime. As they were leaving the the teenage sister told me “I like how you sang the book instead of reading it.”

Once outside the storytime room, the mother started telling me about her youngest daughter, the first grader.

“She’s not a very good reader. She doesn’t like reading. We get books but she doesn’t like to read them. What can I give her to make her read?”

The girl was standing right there, between us.

I was speechless for a moment. This mother’s assessment of her daughter, though presumably well intentioned (after all, they WERE hanging out in the library as a family, asking a librarian for help), was so destructive. I took her over to the children’s area, showed her some high-interest books, gave her some book and app lists, and told her more about what services the library offers, but I’m not sure I gave her the answer she wanted to hear. I commented on how much her daughter did, in fact, enjoy reading and singing, and she had done a very good job of reading with me, and if she liked the format of the books we read together in storytime, the library offers some similar ones through Bookflix and Tumblebooks. I described how apps and eBooks can be a wonderfully motivating format for children (I avoid using phrases like “reluctant reader”), but the whole interaction made me so sad.

I wonder about their home life. It is dangerous to make assumptions about people, but after working with people for awhile, you begin to see patterns. I strongly suspect that those children live in a media-saturated environment (ie television) and that the mother may not have known that you can sit together and sing books (digital or paper) instead of reading them (hence the teenager being surprised that a librarian might do something like that in a library program), or talk about what you see in the pictures and make up your own stories. I also wonder if the mother’s feelings about her own language and literacy skills may have been a limiting factor in the family’s reading environment.

We children’s librarians often sit in our ivory towers recommending books and only books (and paper ones at that!) and it falls on deaf ears because a lot of children now grow up bombarded with multimedia experiences, and an old-fashioned book is just not able to hold their attention in the way it “should.” That little girl was incredibly jazzed about sitting with an adult, sharing some cool books (that just happened to be digital), singing, reading and talking. I wish I’d had an iPad full of high-quality apps to give them to take home, to motivate and invigorate their family, which is probably on the less fortunate side of the digital divide. If the mother doesn’t read to her kids because she’s not very “good” at reading herself, an app or an iBook with the narration setting turned on could provide them the cuddling/bonding opportunity that they may miss out on otherwise.

That child was learning with me. We shared the experience together, and the mother did seem to pay attention as I actively involved her daughter in a joint media engagement experience. This may not look like the literacy of 10, 50 or 100 years ago, but we need as children’s librarians to work with it and make it the best it can be. In some cases we have a lot of damage to undo, and using high quality media intelligently can be a very successful tool to reach children who have already been exposed to too much of the wrong kind of media.

Tablet Tales Pilot: Morgan Hill Library 1

The first in a series of 4 Tablet Tales programs at the Morgan Hill Library was small. Very small.  Like, 4 kids and 5 adults small.  I had prepared a killer program for the fancy library with the high-tech community room (built-in projector, screen and sound system), but my storytime plan went right out the window because my crowd was so small. My Eureka! Leadership Institute colleague Saralyn Otter helped me set up, made an announcement and passed around my booklist and survey, but I think given the recent time change and possibly the location of the library, the 7 o’clock time slot may not be the best for this program in this community. Mornings storytimes sessions at this library can have as many as 80 people in attendance, so they do have well-attended regular programs.  We’ll finish off the next 3 pilots, but if they decide to continue the program they may have to  carefully consider the time slot.

Here is what I planned

Hello Song
Early literacy tip: Music helps your kids learn!
Wiggle my fingers
Book: Click Clack Moo
Hey Diddle Diddle (Smoothie Felt Board App)
Book: Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
Blow up your balloon
Shakers: Shake a Little Shaker
Book: Pete the Cat (iBook)
Movement song: Hot Potato
Here’s a little bunny
May there always be sunshine (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote)
Goodbye song: Blow a Kiss
Clap up high goodbye rhyme

What I actually did

Hello Song
Early literacy tip: Music helps your kids learn!
Wiggle my fingers
Book: Click Clack Moo
Hey Diddle Diddle (Smoothie Felt Board)
Book: Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
App: Wild About Books
App: Go Away, Big Green Monster
App: The Very Cranky Bear
Shakers: Shake a Little Shaker
Book: Pete the Cat (iBook)
Movement song: Hot Potato
The Going to Bed Book
Clap up high goodbye rhyme

Survey Results (2 surveys returned)

What is the age of your child/children that attend storytime?

1-2 years: 0
2-3 years: 1
3-4 years: 0
4-5 years: 1
5 + years: 2

What are the best days/times to attend programs at the library?

  • Mid-morning
  • Late afternoon

What did you like best about this program?

  • Lively
  • Pictures in the stories
  • Story host
  • Books, dancing etc

What did you like least about this program?

  • Small crowd; time of day perhaps?

Would you like to see this program continue at your library?

  • Yes: 2

Did you find it useful to learn about book-based apps and eBooks for young children?

  • Yes, very much so

Tablet Tales Demo at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose

Today I did a demonstration of Tablet Tales for the staff of the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose, plus some mama and baby guinea pigs that I rounded up from other areas in the Museum. I didn’t do an exact headcount, but I’d say there were about 15 staff members and 25 guinea pigs (if anyone who was there did an exact head count, let me know and I’ll update it!)  The program took place in the Lee and Diane Brandenburg Theatre, which is a 40′ x 40′ black box of awesomeness, with killer acoustics, disco lights and a big screen with projector.  Brett Dearing helped me get all set up with my mic, cables, projector and chairs, and he also let me climb up the ladder to the sound/projector booth and check out all the cool lights and things around the perimeter of the theatre.  What a cool venue!  He took this picture from the booth:

What I did

Come and Follow Me (fife)
Introduction
Hello Song
Wiggle my fingers
Book: Olivia (iBook)
Open and shut them
Book: Peas Porridge Hot, Mary Mary Quite Contrary (from Here Comes Mother Goose)
Shakers: Shake a Little Shaker, Hey-Ho the Rattle-o
Book: Pete the Cat (iBook)
Flannel Board: Blue bird (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote)
May there always be sunshine (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote)
Goodbye song: Blow a Kiss
Clap up high goodbye rhyme

What I learned

  1. The projected image was very big; project low so it’s at the same height as me so that the audience understands that I’m still telling the story, even if the “book” is taller than I am.
  2. In a venue that size, always use a mic
  3. Playing my fife to call people into the storytime room is not going to work in a bustling museum with noisy water features and large school groups.  Maybe I should just do a loop around the first floor and hope that as the program becomes a regularly occurring phenomenon, people will know to look for the lady with the fife.
  4. I will have a little more freedom with content in a museum than I would in a library, and people will have fewer pre-conceived notions of what a storytime “should” look like.
  5. The staff at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose are AWESOME!

What I used

AppleTV
iPad
Keynote App
VGA Cable
VGA/HDMI converter
Nexus S (for portable Wifi and Bluetooth)
Projector (specifics forthcoming)

So, what next, and how/why a Children’s Museum?

Next steps will be to meet with the two ladies who thought my idea was a good one in the first place, CDM Executive Director Marilee Jennings and  Education Director Jenni Martin.  We will be working together to submit an IMLS grant to grow this project as a creative collaboration between the Children’s Museum and libraryland.  The idea for this partnership come to me one night when I was feeling particularly frustrated with the slow pace of the development of some of my initiatives; those of you in the library world know how painfully slowly things can move, usually to the detriment of really good ideas.  So I tried to think of other places that I could develop things faster and further, and the Children’s Discovery Museum came to mind right away.  My next step was to find a contact person within the Museum, because the secret to hearing “YES!” is knowing how to ask the right person the right question.  So I sent the letter below to the Chair of the Museum Board and Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer at Adobe, Mark Garrett, who emailed me back immediately and put me in touch with the folks at the Museum.  The rest will soon be history. Keep an eye on this project, people.  We’re going places!

Hi Mark,

My name is Cen Campbell. I am a children’s librarian with the Mountain View Public Library and Santa Clara County Library District, and I run a blog called Little eLit, where I document the development of my digital literacy programming in libraries and keep track of the fantastic new world of interactive digital media for children.

I am writing to you because I have a proposition for a technology-based education project that I would like to implement at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose. The Institute of Museum and Library Services offers a number of large grants specifically designed to support innovative, collaborative projects like this. The grant is due in early 2013 and I would be more than willing to put it all together to get the funds for CDM if the museum would be willing to partner (there is a cost share element). It is my experience that going straight to the board is the way to get things done for out-of-the-box initiatives like this; my sincere apologies if this is not appropriate for your organization.

My idea is this:

I’d like to expand on an idea that I’m piloting at the Santa Clara County Library District (they don’t really have the space or the infrastructure to launch a program of the scope I am envisioning; that’s why I’m reaching out to you). I have developed a digital storytelling program called Tablet Tales which makes use of book-based apps, eBooks and other mobile technology to support literacy development. What I would like to do is run larger-scale digital storytelling programs for schools and other community groups, combined with a “tech petting zoo” of book based apps, ebooks, concept and educational apps housed on tablet computers within the museum for use by children and their parents, teachers or caregivers. I am using iPads for my current programs but am open to experimentation with Android. This project would serve a number of functions: helping to close the digital divide that is still alive and well, even in Silicon Valley; train teachers and parents on how to use technology effectively with their students or children; and performs reader’s advisory services in the digital realm (there is a LOT of content for kids in the app space right now, and to be honest, most of it is junk).

I know that the museum already has partnerships in place with local schools (that’s another reason I’d like to partner with you), and there are other ways we could discuss reaching out to the community at large. I am working with two early childhood education specialists throughEarly Childhood Investigations to develop professional development materials on this topic, I will be presenting at the California Library Association conference on this topic and I am currently serving on the Association for Library Services to Children’s Children and Technology Committee (in other words, I have street cred in this area and I’m pretty sure I can deliver a bleeding edge, high quality, never-been-done before program that would make the museum proud).

If this sounds interesting to you, please let me know. I’m open to ideas, too, and would love the chance to speak with you, or whoever else would be involved in a project like this.

Thank you for reading this email. I know your time is precious.

Cen Campbell

LittleeLit.com

Tablet Tales Pilot #3: Cupertino Library

I drove past Apple HQ to get to storytime tonight. How cool is that?! I did a few newbie-storyteller goofs that I should have known better about; queue the activity song up right at the beginning so it doesn’t start 5 seconds in, and get a colleague to help pass out shakers to avoid being mobbed by four dozen 4 year olds.  The crowd was HUGE: 56 kids and 47 adults, but they were very good participants and were good sports about the fact that I was not their regular storyteller (Hi Judith!) Many thanks to all the Cupertino Library Children’s Librarians for coming to Tablet Tales and giving me supportive feedback.

I’ve only gotten 4 surveys back so far, but if more come in I will update the results.

What is the age of your child/children that attend storytime?

1-2 years: 1
2-3 years: 1
3-4 years: 2
4-5 years: 1
5 + years: 2

What are the best days/times to attend programs at the library?

  • After School
  • 7 PM
  • Tuesdays and Thursdays

What did you like best about this program?

  • Reading (that one was written by a child: What’s cool about this comment is that in this almost entirely digital storytime, she still understood that we were reading; not playing a game or watching a movie)
  • Visibility
  • When they were doing the story on the tablet my daughter got excited
  • Everyone can see clearly
  • Teacher
  • Use of technology

What did you like least about this program?

  • When you were doing head, shoulders knees and toes
  • I don’t like that the program is not available again
  • All good (this was written by a child: what tickles me is that we read Pete the Cat.  And Pete’s moral is: “No matter what you step in, just keep walking along, singing your song. Because it’s all good!” She totally got it!)
  • Less activities, less involvement, tradition

Would you like to see this program continue at your library?

  • Yes: 2
  • No: 2

Did you find it useful to learn about book-based apps and eBooks for young children?

  • Yes: 3
  • No: 1

Additional comments

  • Keep it print
  • Good job!
  • Have this program and TEACHER every week (I didn’t add the all caps- that’s what it says!  I swear!)
  • This program is useful, but my kids like the regular way of storytime.  You can do this monthly.  Once.

Lessons learned

  • It is so hard coming into a brand new community and doing a brand-new program (any change is hard!) It’s hard for the staff, parents, kids AND the interloper.  Trust the local librarians to understand the wants and needs of their community. Provide information and support if they seek it, and be grateful for their graciousness.
  • Mute the TV
  • Music gets people’s attention.  Play an instrument, sing or make a beat.  Technology will never replace the power of a person making a song.
  • Queue music
  • Have a plan for handing out shakers

What I did

Come and follow me (fife)
Hello song
Early literacy skill: Phonological Awareness
Wiggle my fingers
Book: Click Clack Moo
Book: Peas Porridge Hot (from Here Comes Mother Goose, pg 74)
Book: Pete the Cat (iBook)
Shake a little shaker
Movement song: Hot Potato
Balloon calm-down rhyme
Book: The Very Cranky Bear (app)
Head shoulders knees and toes
Book: Going to Bed Book (app)
Clap up high goodbye rhyme

First MVPL Pajama Jam!

We had 49 people total, which was a great turnout considering there was some kind of sporting event tonight (Don’t ask me what. Something that makes non-athletes get really worked up, drink beer and eat deep fried food. Or something.) and a presidential debate.

What I did

Come and Follow Me (Fife)
Storytime Rules (Sit with your kids, Sing, turn off phones, save snacks til later)
Hello Song
Early literacy skill: Phonological Awareness
Wiggle my fingers
Book: Click Clack Moo
I like to ride my horse
Flannel Board: Five green and speckled frogs (Smoothie Felt Board App)
Balloon calm-down rhyme
Book: Peas Porridge Hot (from Here Comes Mother Goose, pg 74)
Book: Dinosaur vs Bedtime
Flannel Board: Blue bird (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote)
Movement song: Hot Potato
Book: Five Little Chicks
Clap up high goodbye rhyme

What I learned

  1. I can use my phone as a portable hotspot to connect the AppleTV and the iPad even in a place where the Wifi never works and my phone rarely has reception.  Not only that, I can simultaneously pair it with Bluetooth speakers and have it play just fine.  The phone needs to be plugged in when doing either/both of those things though because it depletes the battery really quickly.
  2. I have to change the lenth of time that the iPad/AppleTV can be dormant before the screen saver pops up.  It’s distracting to have lovely pictures of grizzly bears floating across the screen when I’m trying to wow people with my mad dinosaur roaring skills.

What I used

AppleTV
iPad
Smoothie Felt Board App
Keynote App
HDMI Cable
Nexus S (for portable Wifi and Bluetooth)
Logitech Mini boombox
PopAdvisions Brightboard (42 inches-ish)

Tablet Tales Pilot #2

Last night was the second in my series of Tablet Tales pilot projects at the Santa Clara County Library District.  Once again I was working with the fabulous Jennifer Weeks at the Campbell Library. There were 14 kids and 12 adults, and 4 surveys were returned with the following results:

What is the age of your child/children that attend storytime?

1-2 years: 1
2-3 years: 0
3-4 years: 2
5 + years: 2

What are the best days/times to attend programs at the library?

Saturdays

What did you like best about this program?

  • The songs
  • Simple stories
  • I like the tablet story
  • Good Stories
  • Easy to see
  • Interaction with teacher for children

What did you like least about this program?

  • None
  • N/A

Would you like to see this program continue at your library?

  • Yes: 4
  • No: 0

Did you find it useful to learn about book-based apps and eBooks for young children?

  • Yes: 4
  • No: 0

Additional comments

  • It is better having a storytime where the book is on a large screen so everyone can see.

Lessons learned

You can’t do airplay/mirroring between the iPad and AppleTV, and pair the iPad with bluetooth speakers at the same time.  This came up because I wanted to turn off all sound from my apps and iBooks, but wanted to play an action song mid-program. Luckily I have about nineteen million devices and different ways to connect them to nineteen million other devices, and I had the choice of either using my Nexus S or New iPad (in addition to the iPad 2, which I was using with the AppleTV), both with the Spotify app, with the Mini Boom Box.  I realize I could have also just used the speakers on the TV, but I didn’t have the remote on me and I like doing things the hard way because it builds character.

Changes implemented based on last week’s survey results

  1. I did another Sandra Boynton app (The Going to Bed Book) without getting the kids to actually touch the iPad.  Other than one older child asking to touch, it worked much better this week.
  2. I used Smoothie Felt Board images saved to Keynote for 5 Green and Speckled Frogs (which I operated while Jennifer sang the words and did the hand motions); as well as for Bluebird and included just the lyrics in large type on the next slide (instead of notation).

Tablet Tales #2 (10/16/2012)
Theme: Animals
Walk in Music: Come and Follow me (Fife)
Opening Song: It’s time for storytime (welcome slide)
Storytime Introduction:
Fingerplay: Wiggle my fingers
Story: My heart is like a zoo (Book)
Story: Wild About Books (App)
Fingerplays:

  • Five little monkeys
  • Bears eat honey
  • Five green and speckled frogs (felt board)

Story: Bear’s Loose Tooth (iBook)
Fingerplays:

  • Boom chicka boom
  • I eat my peas with honey
  • Blue Bird (Felt Board App)

Action Music: Hot Potato (iPod)
Story: Animal Alphabet (App)
Story: Class two at the zoo or chickens to the rescue Jennifer
Story: Going to bed book (App)
Book: Dear Zoo
Goodbye Fingerplay: Clap up high (goodbye slide/list of resources)

Calling all Library Directors!

I’m trying to get as much experience as I can performing digital storytimes in public libraries and other educational institutions.  Would you like to see what all the fuss is about? Let’s talk!

Here’s an email I wrote to a library director recently who indicated she’d be interested in hosting a Tablet Tales program at her library:

Hello [Library Director],

I have been developing a digital storytime called Tablet Tales which incorporates iBooks and apps into a traditional storytime format. I use an AppleTV and either a monitor or projector to display the content from my iPad. I piloted my very first program last night and it was a resounding success (I am already incorporating customer feedback into my plans for next week’s program).

I’d like to get more experience presenting this program in different libraries and communities, and I was wondering if you’d be interested in hosting some of these programs in your library. I think a series of programs (maybe 6?) would work best; that would allow me to get a feel for the community and develop the program from one week to the next. Right now I’m offering the program as a family storytime, mostly in the evenings (this allows working parents to attend) but I’m open to discussing different time slots and days of the week. There were babies last night at the program, but generally I play it safe and stick with 2s and up in accordance with the more conservative AAP recommendations for young children and screen time. That said, I would never turn anyone away from a storytime, especially if a younger child is attending with an older child. The program is not entirely digital; that would be no fun. I am trying to use technology intelligently to support a child’s early literacy development, and I evaluate the digital materials the same way I evaluate analog materials: they have to support the development of the 6 early literacy skills.

I incorporate a lot of music into my programs, as well as props, chants and paper books, plus I’m experimenting with anything I can scan and project onto the screen through Keynote. If you have themes already in place I can work with that, or community-specific early literacy eccentricities, I’d be happy to work with your children’s staff to make my program fit with your current offerings.

If you’d like me to come and do a series of programs at your library, I’d need to know if you have your own techy set up, or if I’d have to arrange for my own. I have developed a digital storytelling collection with the Santa Clara County Library District, and I’d be happy to work with your staff to develop something similar for your library, and to train your staff in how to evaluate and use these resources.

My main goal is to gain more experience working with this technology in an early literacy program setting. Beyond that I am open to your ideas, input and suggestions. You are welcome to send a representative from your library to any of my upcoming programs to see what it’s all about. I plan to record some of my sessions for training purposes.

Thank you,

Cen Campbell

LittleeLit.com

Tablet Tales Pilot #1: Resounding Success!

Last night was the first ever Tablet Tales digital storytelling pilot at the Campbell Library. It was a collaborative effort with the supervising children’s librarian (the fabulous Jennifer Weeks) and a cameo appearance by Lisa H. We had 16 kids (from toddlers to about first graders) and 10 adults.  The program took place at 7:15 and I played my fife and sang everyone a “come to storytime” song. We then tag-teamed with fingerplays, songs, paper books, ibooks, apps, prop stories and a paper folding story. We had the kids’ attention the WHOLE time.  It was especially beneficial having 2 (3!) storytellers when I was switching between apps, iBooks, Keynote etc, but would not be necessary once I’ve had more practice transitioning.The program went a little long (about 45 minutes) but I think we could have kept going, even for the little ones.  We had their full attention the whole time. We got lots of good input from the 7 surveys we got back:

What is the age of your child/children that attend storytime?

1-2 years: 1
2-3 years: 1
3-4 years: 4
5 + years: 3

What are the best days/times to attend programs at the library?

10 am/7 pm Mon, Wed
7:30 pm Tues, Wed Thurs
Evening
Evenings or weekends, anytime
Weekday evenings

What did you like best about this program?

  • [my child] said: “Everything!”
  • 2 children can attend (3 years difference in ages)
  • Kids like being in a group
  • Exposed to new books
  • Digital is an interesting twist on the stories we already know
  • The songs and the books
  • Music
  • Everyone listening
  • Captured attention
  • The variety of material to explore
  • My daughter enjoyed the reading of “Caps for Sale”
  • Music was also good
  • The songs
  • The eBooks

What did you like least about this program?

  • The game “oopsy” [that was Blue Hat Green Hat; it did not register as a book to her!]
  • All kids want to be involved at once [again, that was probably my use of Blue Hat Green Hat where not all kids got to touch the iPad]
  • Digital format
  • Nothing
  • I don’t have access to some of these apps
  • N/A

Would you like to see this program continue at your library?

  • Yes: 6
  • No: 1 “I like what is currently in place”

Did you find it useful to learn about book-based apps and eBooks for young children?

  • Yes: 4
  • No: 0
  • “Somewhat- it’s nice to see the pictures on the big screen but some animations detract from the text”

Additional comments

  • My girls LOVE storytime
  • Liked all elements: dance, digital, paper books, songs, participation, voice of storyteller
  • Thank you!

Given this input and my own feeling about how the program went, I will change the following things:

  1. Don’t get kids to tap iPad unless it’s a REALLY small group (say 5 kids or less).  When I did Blue Hat, Green Hat I went around and got kids to be the “oops.”  It was distracting even for me and did not develop any literacy skills; the kids just wanted to tap and not all of them were able to do so. I think the negative comments related to that activity.  I had designs on a large touch screen monitor to use during storytime when I was initially planning this project, but I think that’s a no-go too.
  2. Don’t use musical notation with lyrics.  That was hopeful on my part; I’m a musician and a trained Music Together teacher.  I love the song Dance to you Daddy, partly because it’s got a funky time signature change midway through it, but the song was too complicated for a group that is not familiar with my style.  Next time I will just use lyrics and choose simpler songs unless I start working with a single community on a regular basis.
  3. When scanning rhymes or images from books, don’t assume that any size will work just because it’s going to be blown up.  Still pay attention to the size of text, white space on the page and quality of illustrations.

Here was our plan, although it got mildly altered  to better direct the energy in the room.

Tablet Time #1 (10/09/2012) Shoes and Hats

Walk in Music: Come and Follow me (Fife)

Opening Song: It’s time for storytime (welcome slide)

Storytime Introduction:

Fingerplay: Wiggle my fingers

Story 1: The Magic Hat

Story 2: Jack and Jill (scanned)

Fingerplays:

  1. Grandma’s hat
  2. My hat has 3 corners
  3. Little Red Wagon (prop)

Story 2: Caps for Sale (iBook)

Fingerplays:

  1. Boom chicka boom
  2. I eat my peas with honey
  3. Dance to your Daddy (Lyrics and musical notation/scanned)

Story 3: Pete the Cat (iBook)

Hat story: (Paper folding Story)

Story 4: Blue Hat Green Hat (App)

Action Music: Hot Potato (Nexus S/Logitech Mini Boom Box)

Book: Aunt Lucy went to buy a hat

Goodbye Fingerplay: Clap up high

(goodbye slide/list of resources)

Tablet Tales Starts Tomorrow!

 

Take a look at SCCLD‘s website.  Tablet Tales starts tomorrow!!

There’s going to be singing, apps, iBooks, dancing, wiggling, awesomeness and innovation incarnate.

I’ll report back on how it goes.  It’s the first in the series of digital early literacy pilot programs.

Tablet Tales at SCCLD

My digital storytelling initiative is ready to launch into the world! On October 9th, 2012 we begin piloting Tablet Tales in 4 of the Santa Clara County Library District‘s community libraries.

Campbell Library 10/9, 10/16, 10/30 at 7:15
Morgan Hill Library 11/28, 12/5, 12/12, 12/19 at 7:00
Cupertino Library 10/23 at 7:00
Los Altos Library 11/8 at 7:00

View my app/booklist here: tablettalestrifold

View the poster here: tablettalescampbell

Ephemera prettified by the fabulous Julie Mount.