Category Archives: Literacy

The Full Little eLit Book is Here: Young Children, New Media, and Libraries

Today is the day: the full Little eLit book is now available! If you’ve been reading the main chapters of the book as they’ve been released serially over the past 9 months, you’ll still want to check out the final product; the full book, linked here, includes appendices that add more context and expand on the chapters on evaluation and digital media in storytimes, among other things.

Click the image above to view the full pdf of the book.

Click the image above to view the full pdf of the book.

We the co-authors of Young Children, New Media, and Libraries: A Guide for Incorporating New Media into Library Collections, Services, and Programs for Families and Children Ages 0-5 hope that this book will provide a solid foundation for your own forays into the topic of early literacy in the digital age, whether you’re just taking your first exploratory steps or looking to expand upon past practice.

And if you have any questions about the book, just let us know in the comments below!

Tech Savvy Library Professionals: Chapter Eight of the Little eLit Book

Today we’re happy to bring you the eighth chapter of the Little eLit book, Young Children, New Media, and Libraries. This chapter, titled “Tech Savvy Library Professionals,” is written by library training coordinator Jennifer Hopwood. It’s available by clicking here, or on the image below.

Tech Savvy Library Professionals

To read more chapters from Young Children, New Media, and Libraries, please visit the “Book” tab of this site.

This project, with many contributing authors, has been a work in progress for some time. This is the final full chapter of the book. In mid-June 2015, the entire work will be available in a single PDF ebook document, including appendices and other additional materials.

Managing New Media for Youth Services: Chapter Seven of the Little eLit Book

Today we’re happy to bring you the seventh chapter of the Little eLit book, Young Children, New Media, and Libraries. This chapter, titled “Managing New Media for Youth Services,” is written by librarian director Genesis Hansen. It’s available by clicking here, or on the image below.

Managing New Media for Youth Services

To read more chapters from Young Children, New Media, and Libraries, please visit the “Book” tab of this site.

This project, with many contributing authors, has been a work in progress for some time. Chapters are being released once per month, on the 15th, until all chapters have been published here. In June 2015, the entire work will be put into a single PDF ebook document, including appendices and other additional materials.

Talking About Our Motivations for Using New Media, by Carissa Christner

During a recent group discussion about different ways that families can make a media plan and how we, as librarians and media mentors, can help them with that complicated topic, Tessa M. Schmidt (of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction) made an excellent suggestion and it really stuck with me. She pointed out that we need to talk to children about “purpose” (I think of it also as “motivation”) when we are deciding whether or not to use new media at a given time. For instance, if your child approaches you with a request to use the iPad, ask them what their purpose for using it is. Are they seeking a specific piece of information? Is there a particular app they’re excited to use? Are they just bored? There’s not necessarily one right answer (although perhaps if we begin realizing that our motivation is frequently boredom-based or “just out of habit” we might be motivated to open up a discussion about other alternative activities or ways to break the habit), but talking directly about our motivations can help our usage to become more purposeful and mindful rather than just a frequent force of habit.

Parents can also talk about their own motivations for using their devices: “I’m just going to check my e-mail quickly because I’m expecting a message from your grandma,” or “I need to check the weather forecast to see if we need to wear our rain boots today.” Grown-ups can also share their motivations for saying “yes” to their child’s request for the iPad: “I need to have a conversation with your doctor right now and I know you’re tired of being in this exam room. Why don’t you try out that new app we played together last night for a few minutes while we wrap up this visit?” or “Would you like to read a book app for one of our bedtime stories tonight?” or even, “I’m not feeling well right now and I need to lie down for a few minutes. Why don’t you come sit beside me on the bed and we can turn on the narrator so you can listen to one of your book apps?”

Be honest with yourself and with your kids about your motivation. I think this will be a great way to bring a mindful awareness to your own use of devices as well as lay solid groundwork for a healthy media diet as your child grows up.

 

Carissa Christner is a librarian with Madison Public Library.

 

New Media in Storytimes: Chapter Six of the Little eLit Book

It’s that time again–time for this month’s release of the next chapter in the Little eLit book, Young Children, New Media, and Libraries. This chapter, titled “New Media in Storytimes: Strategies for Using Tablets in a Program Setting” is co-written by librarians Carissa Christner, Anne Hicks, and Amy Koester. It’s available by clicking here, or on the image below.

New Media in Storytime

To read more chapters from Young Children, New Media, and Libraries, please visit the “Book” tab of this site.

This project, with many contributing authors, has been a work in progress for some time. Chapters are being released once per month, on the 15th, until all chapters have been published here. At that point, the entire work will be put into a single PDF ebook document, including appendices and other additional materials.

Evaluation of New Media: Chapter Five of the Little eLit Book

We are happy to announce the release today of the fifth chapter of our book, Young Children, New Media, and Libraries. This chapter, “Evaluation of New Media,” was co-authored by children’s librarian Claudia Haines and social worker Carisa Kluver. It’s available by clicking here, or on the image below.

Evaluation of New Media

To read more chapters from Young Children, New Media, and Libraries, please visit the “Book” tab of this site.

This project, with many contributing authors, has been a work in progress for some time. Chapters are being released once per month, on the 15th, until all chapters have been published here. At that point, the entire work will be put into a single PDF ebook document, including appendices and other additional materials.

New Media in Inclusive Early Literacy: Chapter Four of the Little eLit Book

We are pleased to announce the release today of the fourth chapter of our book, Young Children, New Media, and Libraries. This chapter, “The Role of New Media in Inclusive Early Literacy Programs & Services,” was written by children’s librarian and doctoral candidate Tess Prendergast. It’s available by clicking here, or on the image below.

New Media in Inclusive Early Literacy Prendergast

To read more chapters from Young Children, New Media, and Libraries, please visit the “Book” tab of this site.

This project, with many contributing authors, has been a work in progress for some time. Chapters are being released once per month, on the 15th, until all chapters have been published here. At that point, the entire work will be put into a single PDF ebook document, including appendices and other additional materials.

Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Chapter Three of the Little eLit Book

Today we are pleased to announce the release of the third chapter of our book, Young Children, New Media, and Libraries. This chapter, entitled “Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Using New Media with Children, Birth through School-age,” was written by children’s librarian Anne Hicks. It’s available by clicking here, or on the image below.

To read more chapters from Young Children, New Media, and Libraries, please visit the “Book” tab of this site.

This project, with many contributing authors, has been a work in progress for some time. Chapters are being released once per month, on the 15th, until all chapters have been published here. At that point, the entire work will be put into a single PDF ebook document, including appendices and other additional materials.

Did you see the preliminary findings from the Young Children, New Media & Libraries survey?

At the beginning of the month, Cen and Liz Mills–two of the folks involved in the Young Children, New Media & Libraries survey–shared some preliminary findings of the survey on the ALSC Blog. Some of the tidbits they shared include that 70% of survey respondents are using new media in their library programs for young children, and that 58% consult some sort of resource before acquiring any new media.

The full results of the survey, a joint effort between ALSC, the iSchool at the University of Washington, and Little eLit, will be published this spring in Children and Libraries. In the meantime, click over to the ALSC Blog post to see a few more early details from the survey.

Children and Technology: Chapter Two of the Little eLit Book

Today we are happily releasing the second chapter of our book, Young Children, New Media, and Libraries. This chapter, entitled “Children and Technology: What can research tell us?,” was written by librarian and doctoral student Tess Prendergast. It’s available by clicking here, or on the image below.

Children and Technology Prendergast

To read more chapters from Young Children, New Media, and Libraries, please visit the “Book” tab of this site.

This project, with many contributing authors, has been a work in progress for some time. Chapters are being released once per month, on the 15th, until all chapters have been published here. At that point, the entire work will be put into a single PDF ebook document, including appendices and other additional materials.

Creative Commons License
This work, including this and subsequent chapters and any appendices, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.