Search Results for books on screen

Books on Screen: Back Again @cdmsj

red socks

I got to do another Books on Screen New Media Storytime at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose as part of their Storyland exhibit.

It’s been a long time since I’ve had the pleasure of doing my own non-workshop/demonstration new media storytime, and I took the opportunity to try out some new things, and I also learned some more techy details:

  1. I ran the program from a brand-spanking new iPod touch (ZOMG it’s pink!). James (my husband) said that it looked more subtle than using the iPad; like I was using it as a remote instead of a “second screen.” This could be good or bad, depending on the kind of program (note this program took place in a black box theatre in a children’s museum with a 40 foot screen; not exactly designed to mimic at-home use)
  2. I learned that a wireless network is NOT the same thing as wifi (in the internet sense) and thus if you set up a hotspot with your phone or what I lovingly refer to as my ZyXEL MWR102 Wireless router (MWR102 for short) and the apps that you are using DON’T require internet, you have enough mojo to keep the iPad and AppleTV talking to each other. Side note: you don’t need the AppleTV to sign into any network if you are directly connecting the wireless router to the AppleTV with an ethernet cable; you only need to make sure the iPad/iPod is connected to the router.
  3. VGA input does not include sound; if you are using an HDMI/VGA adaptor and mirroring through the AppleTV, the device assumes that sound is mirrored too, so you can’t use a wired audio connection. I need to get an optical audio cable to see if that works with the sound system in the museum.
  4. You can use your device as a remote for the AppleTV, but you need the remote to set it up (that last point is very important when you discover you’ve left your AppleTV remote at home and Hubby dearest has to bring it for you. Thank you, James!!)

Attendance:

I had mostly older kids for these programs, so we talked a little more about what was happening in the books (“what does aerodynamic mean?”) and I had a little more leeway to address the parents without the fear of losing the little ones (though I did have some “little birds” at the front of the room who wanted to SHOW me they understood vocabulary words like “soar”)

2:00 PM show: 81
2:45 show: 25

Nothing new in the app selection (it’s a new crowd every time, and it’s been so long since I did a program there!) and I was directing my energy to how I spoke to the parents about why and how we were using digital books with young kids.

What I did:

Intro (different words each time, but this is the gist of what I was trying to get across)

Hello everyone! My name is Cen and I’m a children’s librarian. I’m going to be sharing some books on this VERY big screen today, and we’re going to talk a little bit about new media & young children. How many of you have a smart phone or a tablet at home? [all hands went up] I’m going to be available to talk to you after storytime about apps & ebooks with young kids, and I’m going to share some digital stories with you today. You can check out the paper ones at your library! We librarians love recommending books, so if you’re interested in learning more about media & kids, take a look at Screen Time by Lisa Guersney & Born Reading by Jason Boog. I do want to point out that the American Academy of Pediatrics discourages the use of media for children under 2 years, and that we always recommend that you share all these apps together with your child.

Hello song
Wiggle my fingers
Blue Hat, Green Hat
Activity song: My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean, Jim Gill Style
Blow up your balloon
The Wrong Book
Activity song: I Dropped my Hat, Kathy Reid-Naiman Style
A Frog Thing
I had a Little Frog
Goodbye Song: Blow a kiss, Laurie Berkner Style

 

Books on Screen Storytime Videos

I was digging around in my husband’s computer, and look what I found! Some video documentation of some of the Books on Screen pilot programs I did awhile ago at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose. We’re looking for more videodocumentation of new media storytimes, so please send them along so we can add them to the gallery!

Final @cdmsj Books on Screen Pilot; Next Steps for Continued Programs

associationmuseumLast week I completed the final program in a series of digital storytelling pilot programs at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose. We are planning an ongoing set of programs (perhaps once or twice monthly) which will be sponsored by Bookboard. I’m working with Bookboard to both manage their library (traditional librarian stuff like weeding the bad stuff and acquiring more of the good stuff) and also experimenting with using their platform as a storyteller’s tool within libraries and/or other institutions that provide early literacy programming. I’ll post promo materials etc once we have our next steps all figured out.

For all my colleagues reading this post (children’s librarians or library school students), I highly recommend working with a children’s museum if you haven’t already. In my experience, they run their organizations very differently from libraries, they have a much more user-centric philosophy than what we’re used to in libraries, and they exist to create spaces where children learn (not where they are “taught;” where they LEARN). Libraryland could learn a lot from museumland. Also, the people who work there are often really quirky, open minded and creative. Reach out to a children’s museum, on your own time if you have to (that’s what I’m doing!)

Trust me, it’s worth it for the learning experience, and they may even have a better storytelling facility than yours. Bust your own paradigm and go to a kid’s museum. Tell them you’re a librarian, set up an appointment or informational interview with the director and ask for a tour of the place. Check out the Association of Children’s Museums, too; they have a lot of great resources for things like play spaces, interactivity, STEM, best practices and training.

Attendance:

I had mostly young kids for these programs, so we slowed our songs down, repeated them more times and did 3 books instead of the 4 I had planned.

11 AM show: 78
12 PM show: 25
1 Pm show: 71

Promo info:

Books on Screen Interactive Storytime
Preschool storytime with a digital twist

Saturday, March 2nd, Thursday, March 14th, Tuesday, March 19th and 26th
11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., 12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m., and 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Children’s Librarian Cen Campbell incorporates apps and eBooks into a traditional preschool storytime to support early literacy and language development. This format provides children and caretakers a better view of the books while modeling positive media behavior and helping parents understand how to maintain a balanced media diet in an increasingly digital world. Come and learn new songs and rhymes, and read classic and contemporary picture books on the big screen!

What I did:

Hello song
Parent talking point: Why  ”Books on Screen”? Because it’s a children’s librarian’s job to recommend the best books there are in ANY format! These are some good apps you can share with your children!
Wiggle my fingers
Blue Hat, Green Hat
Activity song: Row row row your boat to the orchard
Farmer Brown had 5 green apples
The Very Hungry Bear
Felt Board: Blue bird (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote)
The Wrong Book
Activity song: See the sleeping bunnies (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote))
Blow a kiss
Goodbye rhyme: Clap up high

Books on Screen @cdmsj Children’s Discovery Museum San Jose March 19

IMG_20130319_133250 (1)

Brett the Books on Screen Photobomber

This set of storytimes had mostly younger kids (0-4ish) in them; each of the programs I did was different because each group had a different kind of energy. I had a storytime plan to use older, different books because the kids last week were older, but I tossed my plan out the window and did material I had done recently that worked well with younger kids.

Attendance:

11 AM show: 76
12 PM show: 33
1 Pm show: 41

Promo info:

Books on Screen Interactive Storytime
Preschool storytime with a digital twist

Saturday, March 2nd, Thursday, March 14th, Tuesday, March 19th and 26th
11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., 12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m., and 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Children’s Librarian Cen Campbell incorporates apps and eBooks into a traditional preschool storytime to support early literacy and language development. This format provides children and caretakers a better view of the books while modeling positive media behavior and helping parents understand how to maintain a balanced media diet in an increasingly digital world. Come and learn new songs and rhymes, and read classic and contemporary picture books on the big screen!

What I did (all 3 shows were different and did not include all of these, so this is more of a list of resources than storytime plan):

Hello song
Parent talking point: Why  ”Books on Screen”? Because it’s a children’s librarian’s job to recommend the best books there are in ANY format! These are some good apps you can share with your children!
Wiggle my fingers

Activities/Songs:
Felt Board: Blue bird (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote)
Activity song: See the sleeping bunnies (lyrics in Keynote)
Row Row Row your boat
Farmer Brown had 5 green apples
Zoom zoom zoom
Here’s a little bunny

Apps:
Mr Brown Can Moo, Can you?
Trucks
Trains
Goodnight Moon
Saffy looks for Rain

Blow a kiss
Goodbye rhyme: Clap up high

Books on Screen @cdmsj Children’s Discovery Museum

cencdm

This was the second full set of Books on Screen programs at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose.

Things I realized during this set of programs:

  1. I have always had trouble with pacing; I’m a very bouncy, high-energy person and it takes a lot of work for me to slow down and move at the pace of the children (and parents) in the room. When I first started working with apps in storytime I often got annoyed when it took too long for an app to load, or for pages to turn within the app. But now I realize that this might actually be a blessing in disguise because I am forced to slow down and wait for the app before barreling through the story again. I mentioned this in a workshop I co-lead on Friday and we all marveled at how this cutting edge, fast-moving technology is actually forcing some of us to slow down.
  2. Even if we assume screen time is a bad thing all around and that kids get too much of it, using apps in storytime is a way that you can insert a real, live bouncy person into the kid-plus-screen equation. We can model for parents that they really can read an app to their children in the same way they could read a book. We can take what might become bad media consumption habits and make them interactive, face-to-face family time.

Attendance:

11 AM show: 64
12 PM show: 34
1 Pm show: 39

Promo info:

Books on Screen Interactive Storytime
Preschool storytime with a digital twist

Saturday, March 2nd, Thursday, March 14th, Tuesday, March 19th and 26th
11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., 12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m., and 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Children’s Librarian Cen Campbell incorporates apps and eBooks into a traditional preschool storytime to support early literacy and language development. This format provides children and caretakers a better view of the books while modeling positive media behavior and helping parents understand how to maintain a balanced media diet in an increasingly digital world. Come and learn new songs and rhymes, and read classic and contemporary picture books on the big screen!

What I did:

Hello song
Parent talking point: Why  ”Books on Screen”? Because it’s a children’s librarian’s job to recommend the best books there are in ANY format! These are some good apps you can share with your children!
Wiggle my fingers
App: Mr Brown Can Moo, Can you?
Felt Board: Blue bird (Smoothie Felt Board App; image, then lyrics in Keynote)
App: Llama Llama Red Pajama App (I used the App this week; last week I used the iBook)
Activity song: See the sleeping bunnies (lyrics in Keynote)
App: Trains
Zoom zoom zoom
App: The Very Cranky Bear
Here’s a little bunny
Blow a kiss
Goodbye rhyme: Clap up high

Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose: Books on Screen Pilot

kissinghand

Today was the first in a series of digital storytelling pilot projects at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose. The pilot is called Books on Screen and it’s held in the Museum’s WAY COOL theatre (I’ve done one demo for them already, but this is the start of the “official” program).

It’s a good thing I’m usually VERY early for programs; I forgot my HDMI/VGA adapter at home and had to hoof it up and down the 101 again. I had my HDMI cable with me, but that’s what I need for a TV or bright board screen, not a projector.  Here’s a tip: make a list of all the techy things you need, and establish a workflow for each stage of your set-up (for me so far there are two different set ups: projector or TV). Before leaving home I should check my workflow and accompanying list.

Attendance:

11 AM show: 56
12 PM show: 39
1 Pm show: 57

Promo info:

Books on Screen Interactive Storytime
Preschool storytime with a digital twist

Saturday, March 2nd, Thursday, March 14th, Tuesday, March 19th and 26th
11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., 12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m., and 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Children’s Librarian Cen Campbell incorporates apps and eBooks into a traditional preschool storytime to support early literacy and language development. This format provides children and caretakers a better view of the books while modeling positive media behavior and helping parents understand how to maintain a balanced media diet in an increasingly digital world. Come and learn new songs and rhymes, and read classic and contemporary picture books on the big screen!

What I did:

Hello song
Parent talking point: Why  “Books on Screen”? Because it’s a children’s librarian’s job to recommend the best books there are in ANY format! These are some good apps you can share with your children!
Wiggle my fingers
Saffy looks for Rain
Activity song: Farmer Brown had 5 green apples
The Kissing Hand
Humpty Dumpty screenshot (from Bookboard, below)
Llama llama Red Pajama iBook (that link is for the app; not available for purchase anymore as iBook?)
Activity song: See the sleeping bunnies
Activity song: Alabama Mississippi
Goodnight Moon
Blow a kiss
Goodbye rhyme: Clap up high

humpty

What I used

AppleTV
iPad
Keynote App
VGA Cable
VGA/HDMI converter
Nexus S (Wifi hotspot to connect iPad and AppleTV)
Projector

Using the Sesame Street Family Play App to Play Together On and Off the Screen, by Naomi Smith

Let’s talk transitions. Storytellers and librarians are no doubt familiar with trying to come up with the perfect transitions in story times. I have used fun apps like Animal Sounds or Endless Alphabet as transitional activities between books in my Toddler Times. Parents too, are faced with a series of transitions for their young children. Waking up, going potty, brushing teeth, getting dressed, eating breakfast, playing, cleaning up, potty again, putting on shoes, getting into the car. All of this and more before story time! Wouldn’t it be cool to be able to share apps with parents that could help assist with transitions and waiting and kept the parent and child engaged with each other?

My go-to app for this is Sesame Street Family Play. It suggests real life games to play with children. The package of games for home comes with the $.99 app, download games for both travel and away from home for $1.99 more. The app asks simple questions to start, like your location and whether you have certain materials handy. If you say no, no problem, it moves right along. It then suggests a quick game, endorsed by one of the Sesame Street characters, that a caregiver and child(ren) can play together right that minute.

IMG_8511My children, ages two and four, and I enjoy playing together on my iPad. But they often have a difficult time transitioning to another activity. Enter Family Play. One night, after we had played with two apps, one of each child’s choosing, I chose Family Play. I told the kids that we were going to look at the iPad and a Sesame Street friend would suggest a game. They were sold. First, we measured the living room in lengths of kid (8.5 if you were wondering), then we played a game where the first person to find an object to put on their head was the winner and the most creative was also a winner. The app even tells you which skills you are helping your child develop by playing. We’ve also used the app when transitioning between non screen activities. The time between clean up and bath time went from boredom and sibling squabbles to pretending to be frogs and hopping over lily pads made of throw pillows. Yes, I can think of games on my own, but it’s always nice to have an assist after a long day.

Family Play is a favorite of mine personally. However, there are many other apps that would fit the bill for all sorts of families. Why not do a couple of fun math problems with Bedtime Math, learn a few new rhymes with ACPL Family, dance with the Laurie Berkner Band, or create a story about your day together using Our Story for iPad? All free to download! What apps do you like best for helping parents and children have fun together, both on and off the screen?

Naomi Smith is a Youth Services Librarian for the Parkland/Spanaway branch of the Pierce County Library System in Tacoma, WA where gets to do the Baby and Toddler Story Times. She occasionally tweets at @Naomireads.
 
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Little eLit is a collaborative think tank of professionals thinking about the topic of young children, new media, and libraries. Individuals who share their viewpoints, experiences, and presentations in Little eLit blog posts are expressing their personal views and do not represent Little eLit as a whole.

Interested in Apps, iPads, eBooks and Other New Media with Young Kids?

If yes, we would love it if you would join the conversation. We have a Google group that serves as the LittleeLit Think Tank (it functions like a listserv so you can interact with it via email, but also an online collaboration tool) where participants post new research, app suggestions, ask logistics questions, or share cool new things they’re tried in their libraries.

We’d love to have you join the conversation! You don’t need to be an expert, and you can even lurk for a bit before sharing or asking anything. We are entirely crowd-sourced and grass-roots, and we believe that everyone has something to share on this topic. Please join us! We want to hear what you’re up to, and if you have a question, there are lots of folks who might be able to answer it.

Screen Shot 2014-07-09 at 9.36.15 AM

ECRR 2.0: Using Apps and eBooks in Early Literacy Programs

Many thanks to Dorothy Stoltz, Dr Chip Donohue, Carisa Kluver, Naomi Smith, Dr Betsy Diamant-Cohen & Tess Prendergast for serving on our ECRR 2.0: Using Apps and eBooks in Early Literacy Programs panel at ALA in Las Vegas this past weekend. Below are my brief slides, Chip’s slides, Carisa’s book app review criteria, Naomi & Tess’ resources & app recommendations, and all the other apps that everyone shared, plus apps that came up in discussion after the panel.

Naomi Smith

Website:

Pierce County Library’s Digital Kids site: tips on healthy media use, library e-book recommendations, and app recommendations from librarians for Android and iOS devices aimed at ages 2-6 and their caregivers.

Apps demoed:

Letter School from Sanoma Netherlands BV—Writing

Endless Alphabet from Originator—Talking, Playing, Vocabulary

Bunny Fun: Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes  from Auryn Media–Singing

The Monster at the End of This Book  from Sesame Workshop—Reading and Playing

Tess Prendergast

Collins Big Cat: It Was a Cold, Dark Night Story Creator By HarperCollins Publishers Ltd

Tess’s review:
For a free app, parents, caregivers and children get a lot! This is a lovely bedtime story app book that is suitable to read to children ages 2 and up. Emerging readers will love reading it themselves or listening to the charming narration. Although it has interactive elements on each page (swishing leaves, glowing lights etc.) none of them seem particularly distracting from the main story, which is about Ned the hedgehog’s search for a cozy place to sleep for the winter. After finishing the story, readers can set about making up their own stories, using a collection of illustrations and backgrounds. Once a scene has been created, you can add both written and spoken text to accompany each page. The story is suitable for telling at storytime, preferably projected onto a screen for good visibility. Following that, I recommend briefly demonstrating how parents and their children can make up their own night time stories to tell and retell. If you have iPads in your library available for families to use, I highly recommend this app. This would be a particularly good choice for parent-child app workshops where participants have time to play with the app together.

Our Story by the Open University

Tess’s review:
I found out about this free app when I read a recent academic paper about the use of iPads in early childhood classrooms that was written by some UK scholars (Flewitt, Messer, & Kucirkova, 2014). I downloaded the app immediately and started playing with it. Basically, it is allows you to write and narrate simple books using the device’s camera roll pictures to illustrate your story. I used photographs from a recent program to write and narrate a short book but the possibilities are endless. Anything that can be captured on the camera can be incorporated into books. The books can be saved and easily sent as pdfs and/or audiovisual files to anyone else over email. Because of its simplicity, this would be a great app to recommend to parents of very young children who want to make stories about their daily lives together with their children to send to grandparents or other relatives and friends. I particularly like the ease by which one can add recordings to accompany the pictures. It would be wonderful to receive a story narrated with a young child’s first words wouldn’t it? The pdf versions can easily be printed and bound into lovely little books. Highly recommended for parents and anyone else who works with young children.

Reference

Flewitt, R., Messer, D., & Kucirkova, N. (2014). New directions for early literacy in a digital age: The iPad. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy. doi: 10.1177/1468798414533560

Superhero Booth HD for iPad

Tess’s review:
I used this .99 cent app as part of a Superhero party for our summer reading club. We had 5 stations: books; art; Captain Underpants names chart; puzzles & quizzes; photo booth. We took pictures of the kids one at a time and helped them select their superhero embellishments. We then printed them out and emailed the pictures to their parents’ email addresses. They were really cute and kids loved making themselves into superheroes!

Go Away, Big Green Monster! for iPad By Night & Day Studios, Inc.

Tess’s review:
Probably one of the best children’s book apps, this version of the perfect picture book has it all. A read aloud option, two different narrated options (one by a child, the other by the original book’s author, Ed Emberley) and a wonderful sing-a-long version. I personally recommend using this app in storytime programs or parent-child app workshops only after reading the traditional print book at least once all the way through. I have successfully used this app in Halloween or Monster themed programs as well as in early childhood education workshops where book apps for young children are examined and discussed.

Mother Goose on the Loose App

Carisa’s Criteria for Reviewing Book Apps:

Criteria Consistent Across Formats for Kid’s Illustrated Content (ebooks, apps, print)

New Criteria to Consider for Digital Formats

High Quality Illustrations

Relevant enhancements that support narrative

Easy to Read, Large Font

Seamless integration of features & enhancements

Developmentally Appropriate Content (Length, Reading Level, Topics, Language)

Audio & Sound effects that don’t interfere with voice-over or other features.

Well-written, nicely paced & chunked text

Technical polish, stability, ease of use & navigation settings, flexible use.

High Quality Content (not thinly disguised advertisement for game, movie, food, etc.)

No ads, in-app purchases & links that leave the app (unless under sufficient parental gate).

Engaging content worth of return visits

Clearly identified author/illustrator/producer.

Ways to extend beyond the book

Quality games or other extras (if present) that do not interrupt narrative or reading comprehension.

Early Literacy Tips on Screen, by Anne Hicks

Since I had my flat screen television and Apple TV installed, I’ve been testing out various ways to utilize them in storytime. From the beginning I’ve used it during toddler storytime to mirror apps, ebooks, and song sheets. I had not used it during baby storytime because I was unsure how best to use it with this age group and whether I should use it with them at all. I believe that tablets can be used with very small children but the use should revolve around child and adult interactions. That is more easily achieved through one-on-one sharing of a tablet. A fleet of tablets would be perfect for that but alas, I only have one storytime tablet (which I am very grateful to have!).

Screen Shot 2014-04-26 at 7.04.41 AM

I decided to use the iPad to mirror early literacy tips onto the big screen. I try to keep it very simple with just a few tips per storytime. I have “branded” the information by including my library’s logo. I leave the information up throughout the entire storytime and have definitely noticed people reading it and commenting on it. I had previously included early literacy tips on my handouts but wasn’t sure how many of the caregivers were actually reading them. I thought it wouldn’t hurt to try sharing the information in another way, and it seems to be pretty effective.

Screen Shot 2014-04-26 at 7.04.50 AM

Another thing I plan to try during my next session of baby storytime is to use the iPad to mirror the rhymes and songs we’ll be reciting. I hope to just put one rhyme/song up on the screen at a time and swipe through them as we go through the storytime. This idea occurred to me, but I talked myself out of it thinking that parents would rather have the paper handouts. However, during my last storytime, a mother actually said to me, “Have you thought of using the TV to share the rhymes?” She said she would prefer that because then she wouldn’t have to try to keep the paper sheet out of her daughter’s mouth and would be able to focus on the rhymes more.

So I’ll give it a try and see how it goes. The wonderful thing about having this technology available is that I’m able to test out different ways to use it and see what works best for me and my patrons.

Anne Hicks is a Children’s Librarian with the Henrietta Public Library.
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Little eLit is a collaborative think tank of professionals thinking about the topic of young children, new media, and libraries. Individuals who share their viewpoints, experiences, and presentations in Little eLit blog posts are expressing their personal views and do not represent Little eLit as a whole.